The Tale of Omekagu – Chapter Five

The tale of Omekagu, An Igbo folk tale

The Tale of Omekagu – Chapter Five, Igbo to English translation, Mike Ejeagha’s song, Omekagu, lyrics, Igbo folk music, Opi, Omenani, folksong, Fablingverse folktales, Igbo folktale, fabling, ọfọ na ogu, free to read, read free stories from Africa

Back at the palace, Seeing that the elders would not adhere to his wish, the king decided to take matters into his hands. He sent for his highest-ranked guard, and servant and instructed them to clad Omekagu in the finest attire and jewellery that he owned then with the guard’s protection, they would place Omekagu on the king’s horse and proclaim him the rightful heir to the throne.

Not having a say in the matter, the servants and guards did as they had been instructed. Omekagu was presented to the villagers as their rightful heir. It was a spectacle, the villagers were in shock, but they were also intrigued by the spectacle, they sent words around so that others could witness what they had witnessed, and as the words went around, they got to Omekagu’s brother who had just returned from his quest.

On hearing what the king had done, he was overcome with anger. The king had taken that which belonged to him and given it to the son he loved, so he would take that which the king loved. He took out his flute and blew into it.

Opi mu fugbuelum Omekagụ; fugbuelum Omekagụ

My horn, please, blow Omekagu to death

Omekagụ li ji Mmụọ; Omekagụ li ede Mmụọ

Omekagụ ate the yam of the Spirit; Omekagụ ate the cocoyam of the Spirit

Ọbụ n’i fugbuelum Omekagụ, fugbuelum Omekagụ

If you blow Omekagụ to death, blow Omekagụ to death

Ka m welu ebini guo yi aka

So I will sacrifice a ram to clap for you

Ọbụ na I fugbuelum Omekagụ, fugbuelum Omekagụ

If you blow Omekagụ to death, blow Omekagụ to death

Ka m welu ebini guo yi aka

So I will sacrifice a ram to clap for you

Ma na gị jide ogu, jide ọfọ; Ma na gị jide ogu, jidekwa ọfọ

But hold justice and fairness when you do this.

Oh ho ho oh ho oh ho. Oh ho ho oh ho oh ho.

Ọbụ ni fugbuelum Omekagụ, fugbuelum Omekagụ

If you blow Omekagụ to death, blow Omekagụ to death

Ka m welu ebini guo yi aka

So I will sacrifice a ram to clap for you

Ọbụ na I fugbuelum Omekagụ, fugbuelum Omekagụ

If you blow Omekagụ to death, blow Omekagụ to death

Ka m welu ebini guo yi aka

So I will sacrifice a ram to clap for you

Ma na gị jide ogu, jide ọfọ; Ma na gị jide ogu, jidekwa ọfọ

But hold justice and fairness when you do this.

Oh ho ho oh ho oh ho. Oh ho ho oh ho oh ho.

Omekagu felt uncomfortable with the attention, he never understood why his father despised his elder brother, and now was ensuring that he and his brother would forever be enemies. He kept a straight face unsure of how to react until, to his relief, the discomfort ended. He slumped.

The guard rushed to catch him before he would hit the group, he was relieved that he caught him, but his relief quickly turned to panic. Omekagu was dead.

The villagers went into a frenzy. Omekagu had slumped and died while claiming his brother’s throne, word spread around and before the head guard would and arrived at the palace with the dead child, the King and Queen heard the news. They broke down and cried.

The queen blamed the king for provoking the gods and the king blamed his first wife for cursing him and vowed that he will rather have no heir than pass the throne to her son.

As they mourned their dead son, the dibia arrived with the elders.

When they saw the dead little boy, they shook their heads in pity.

“A child will suffer for the foolishness of his father.” Elder 1 said.

“Please, please, bring back my son!” The king begged the dibia.

The dibia sat on the floor and threw his Afa, as they landed he shook his head and then looked up at the king. “You have brought this upon Omekagu.”

“Me, how?” The king asked. “I only gave him what was mine”

“No, the throne does not belong to you, it belongs to the gods. They decided who would sit upon it, and decided that it should be passed to the first son.” The Dibia said. “But you have seized what belongs to the gods as yours, and given it to the one you loved. You have stolen the rights of your first son and handed it to your second son. And now your second son has paid the price.”

“Please, what can we do, please, I just need my son back.” The queen cried.

“You also partook n your husband’s foolishness, you cheered at his wickedness.” The dibia said. “This is as much your punishment as it is his.”

“Please, I’ll do anything.” The queen begged. “He is my only child.”

“You must send for your first son, only he can ask the gods to revive Omekagu.”

“What do you mean only my first son?” The king asked/

“The gods have placed all that you treasure in his hands, including your life.” The dibia said.

As they spoke, Omekagu’s brother walked in. There was something different about him, he seemed more king-like than the king ever was and for the first time in a long time, the king’s first wife entered the palace behind her son.

What do you think?

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Omekagu lyrics and story mike ejeagha igbo to englich translation

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The Tale of Omekagu – Chapter Six